Foreign Exchange Trader Salary in United States

Should I alter my career path for FX?

I am a premed student that just finished college and is on course to start medical school next fall (2021). I've always been pretty good at school and absolutely love science. My mom is a doctor, and 2 of my siblings are also docs. I'm the youngest. I also have a few cousins that are docs. As you can probably guess, I've been kind of groomed to be a doctor. There's always quite a bit of pressure from my family to become a doctor. However, my parents put me through school with no loans and gave me pocket money so they do have a lot invested in my career choice. Also, nuclear and extended family members have always told me that out of all the kids (siblings + cousins), I specifically am the one that needs to be a doctor (due to academic ability and the way my brain processes things). So the pressure is for sure there lol.
My issue is that I discovered the forex market a little over a year ago and absolutely fell in love with trading. I've been pretty consistent in learning about the market and practicing for the whole year. I found a good strategy that *actually* works, learned to manage my emotions, and I'm now starting to see overall profits. Obviously I still have a long way to go until I could returns significant enough to provide for a family doing this, but it seems very very lucrative.
If I become a doctor, I'd finish residency about a decade from now. By then, if I had consistently been getting better at trading for a decade, I would be making much more than my salary as a physician. So, I wonder: why would I continue to waste my time practicing medicine? I think I would enjoy practicing medicine, but why would I do it while I could do something I like just as much, and make more money. On top of that, wouldn't that mean the decade in school/residency was a giant waste of time? On the other side of the argument, 95% of retail traders don't make any money, so I assume that thinking I'll be making those significant returns in 10 years may be a long shot.
It's not all about the money though. I genuinely have always seen myself as a doctor. It's almost like a personality trait. I always want to be the one to figure or what's wrong with someone, or be responsible for treating a wound. When the Covid-19 pandemic started getting bad, I felt a very strong urge to be on the front lines helping, regardless of the risk.
I've always thought it would be exciting to actually use the knowledge I learned to diagnose and treat patients. I really really like human science. To the point that I've already made some the connections that'll be taught in medical school, just because of additional research I've done to cure my curiosity. Human science is for sure my thing, so I'd think medicine should be as well.
On top of all this, I am way more inclined to study trading than to study medicine. I've studied forex information for 10-12hrs straight before and not even noticed it was already 4am. In contrast, I have to force myself to open up MCAT books (even though I love science), and detest traditional school/tests. Although, I'm the type of person that can push through and do what needs to be done, whether I like it or not.
(TLDR) In a nutshell, I love both trading and medicine. However, I'm not sure if I could balance the two together through medical school/residency, and then while actually practicing. I also doubt that I will actually continue practicing medicine if I'm making a lot of money trading. Am I being unrealistic?
Sorry this was so long, but I really need some advice/perspective on how I should move forward. Thanks for reading!!!!

FYI: I understand that FX is not at all a get rich quick kind of thing. I'm more than willing to put in the work and I have been for the past year.


Edit: probably should have mentioned that I trade for a prop firm with a scaling plan. So no I don't intend on using my own money to trade for a while lol
submitted by VictoryLane7 to Forex [link] [comments]

Should I become a doc? (sos problems but here for laughs)

I am a premed student that just finished college and is on course to start medical school next fall (2021). I've always been pretty good at school and absolutely love science. My mom is a doctor, and 2 of my siblings are also docs. I'm the youngest. I also have a few cousins that are docs. As you can probably guess, I've been kind of groomed to be a doctor. There's always quite a bit of pressure from my family to become a doctor. However, my parents put me through school with no loans and gave me pocket money so they do have a lot invested in my career choice. Also, nuclear and extended family members have always told me that out of all the kids (siblings + cousins), I specifically am the one that needs to be a doctor (due to academic ability and the way my brain processes things). So the pressure is for sure there lol.
My issue is that I discovered the forex market a little over a year ago and absolutely fell in love with trading. I've been pretty consistent in learning about the market and practicing for the whole year. I found a good strategy that *actually* works, learned to manage my emotions, and I'm now starting to see overall profits. Obviously I still have a long way to go until I could returns significant enough to provide for a family doing this, but it seems very very lucrative.
If I become a doctor, I'd finish residency about a decade from now. By then, if I had consistently been getting better at trading for a decade, I would be making much more than my salary as a physician. So, I wonder: why would I continue to waste my time practicing medicine? I think I would enjoy practicing medicine, but why would I do it while I could do something I like just as much, and make more money. On top of that, wouldn't that mean the decade in school/residency was a giant waste of time? On the other side of the argument, 95% of retail traders don't make any money, so I assume that thinking I'll be making those significant returns in 10 years may be a long shot.
It's not all about the money though. I genuinely have always seen myself as a doctor. It's almost like a personality trait. I always want to be the one to figure or what's wrong with someone, or be responsible for treating a wound. When the Covid-19 pandemic started getting bad, I felt a very strong urge to be on the front lines helping, regardless of the risk.
I've always thought it would be exciting to actually use the knowledge I learned to diagnose and treat patients. I really really like human science. To the point that I've already made some the connections that'll be taught in medical school, just because of additional research I've done to cure my curiosity. Human science is for sure my thing, so I'd think medicine should be as well.
On top of all this, I am way more inclined to study trading than to study medicine. I've studied forex information for 10-12hrs straight before and not even noticed it was already 4am. In contrast, I have to force myself to open up MCAT books (even though I love science), and detest traditional school/tests. Although, I'm the type of person that can push through and do what needs to be done, whether I like it or not.
(TLDR) In a nutshell, I love both trading and medicine. However, I'm not sure if I could balance the two together through medical school/residency, and then while actually practicing. I also doubt that I will actually continue practicing medicine if I'm making a lot of money trading. Am I being unrealistic?
Sorry this was so long, but I really need some advice/perspective on how I should move forward. Thanks for reading!!!!
submitted by VictoryLane7 to shittyadvice [link] [comments]

Should I become a doctor?

I am a premed student that just finished college and is on course to start medical school next fall (2021). I've always been pretty good at school and absolutely love science. My mom is a doctor, and 2 of my siblings are also docs. I'm the youngest. I also have a few cousins that are docs. As you can probably guess, I've been kind of groomed to be a doctor. There's always quite a bit of pressure from my family to become a doctor. However, my parents put me through school with no loans and gave me pocket money so they do have a lot invested in my career choice. Also, nuclear and extended family members have always told me that out of all the kids (siblings + cousins), I specifically am the one that needs to be a doctor (due to academic ability and the way my brain processes things). So the pressure is for sure there lol.
My issue is that I discovered the forex market a little over a year ago and absolutely fell in love with trading. I've been pretty consistent in learning about the market and practicing for the whole year. I found a good strategy that *actually* works, learned to manage my emotions, and I'm now starting to see overall profits. Obviously I still have a long way to go until I could returns significant enough to provide for a family doing this, but it seems very very lucrative.
If I become a doctor, I'd finish residency about a decade from now. By then, if I had consistently been getting better at trading for a decade, I would be making much more than my salary as a physician. So, I wonder: why would I continue to waste my time practicing medicine? I think I would enjoy practicing medicine, but why would I do it while I could do something I like just as much, and make more money. On top of that, wouldn't that mean the decade in school/residency was a giant waste of time? On the other side of the argument, 95% of retail traders don't make any money, so I assume that thinking I'll be making those significant returns in 10 years may be a long shot.
It's not all about the money though. I genuinely have always seen myself as a doctor. It's almost like a personality trait. I always want to be the one to figure or what's wrong with someone, or be responsible for treating a wound. When the Covid-19 pandemic started getting bad, I felt a very strong urge to be on the front lines helping, regardless of the risk.
I've always thought it would be exciting to actually use the knowledge I learned to diagnose and treat patients. I really really like human science. To the point that I've already made some the connections that'll be taught in medical school, just because of additional research I've done to cure my curiosity. Human science is for sure my thing, so I'd think medicine should be as well.
On top of all this, I am way more inclined to study trading than to study medicine. I've studied forex information for 10-12hrs straight before and not even noticed it was already 4am. In contrast, I have to force myself to open up MCAT books (even though I love science), and detest traditional school/tests. Although, I'm the type of person that can push through and do what needs to be done, whether I like it or not.
(TLDR) In a nutshell, I love both trading and medicine. However, I'm not sure if I could balance the two together through medical school/residency, and then while actually practicing. I also doubt that I will actually continue practicing medicine if I'm making a lot of money trading. Am I being unrealistic?
Sorry this was so long, but I really need some advice/perspective on how I should move forward. Thanks for reading!!!!
submitted by VictoryLane7 to careerguidance [link] [comments]

Should I quit the medical path?

I am a premed student that just finished college and is on course to start medical school next fall (2021). I've always been pretty good at school and absolutely love science. My mom is a doctor, and 2 of my siblings are also docs. I'm the youngest. I also have a few cousins that are docs. As you can probably guess, I've been kind of groomed to be a doctor. There's always quite a bit of pressure from my family to become a doctor. However, my parents put me through school with no loans and gave me pocket money so they do have a lot invested in my career choice. Also, nuclear and extended family members have always told me that out of all the kids (siblings + cousins), I specifically am the one that needs to be a doctor (due to academic ability and the way my brain processes things). So the pressure is for sure there lol.
My issue is that I discovered the forex market a little over a year ago and absolutely fell in love with trading. I've been pretty consistent in learning about the market and practicing for the whole year. I found a good strategy that *actually* works, learned to manage my emotions, and I'm now starting to see overall profits. Obviously I still have a long way to go until I could returns significant enough to provide for a family doing this, but it seems very very lucrative.
If I become a doctor, I'd finish residency about a decade from now. By then, if I had consistently been getting better at trading for a decade, I would be making much more than my salary as a physician. So, I wonder: why would I continue to waste my time practicing medicine? I think I would enjoy practicing medicine, but why would I do it while I could do something I like just as much, and make more money. On top of that, wouldn't that mean the decade in school/residency was a giant waste of time? On the other side of the argument, 95% of retail traders don't make any money, so I assume that thinking I'll be making those significant returns in 10 years may be a long shot.
It's not all about the money though. I genuinely have always seen myself as a doctor. It's almost like a personality trait. I always want to be the one to figure or what's wrong with someone, or be responsible for treating a wound. When the Covid-19 pandemic started getting bad, I felt a very strong urge to be on the front lines helping, regardless of the risk.
I've always thought it would be exciting to actually use the knowledge I learned to diagnose and treat patients. I really really like human science. To the point that I've already made some the connections that'll be taught in medical school, just because of additional research I've done to cure my curiosity. Human science is for sure my thing, so I'd think medicine should be as well.
On top of all this, I am way more inclined to study trading than to study medicine. I've studied forex information for 10-12hrs straight before and not even noticed it was already 4am. In contrast, I have to force myself to open up MCAT books (even though I love science), and detest traditional school/tests. Although, I'm the type of person that can push through and do what needs to be done, whether I like it or not.
(TLDR) In a nutshell, I love both trading and medicine. However, I'm not sure if I could balance the two together through medical school/residency, and then while actually practicing. I also doubt that I will actually continue practicing medicine if I'm making a lot of money trading. Am I being unrealistic?
Sorry this was so long, but I really need some advice/perspective on how I should move forward. Thanks for reading!!!!
submitted by VictoryLane7 to FinancialCareers [link] [comments]

Should I change my career path?

I am a premed student that just finished college and is on course to start medical school next fall (2021). I've always been pretty good at school and absolutely love science. My mom is a doctor, and 2 of my siblings are also docs. I'm the youngest. I also have a few cousins that are docs. As you can probably guess, I've been kind of groomed to be a doctor. There's always quite a bit of pressure from my family to become a doctor. However, my parents put me through school with no loans and gave me pocket money so they do have a lot invested in my career choice. Also, nuclear and extended family members have always told me that out of all the kids (siblings + cousins), I specifically am the one that needs to be a doctor (due to academic ability and the way my brain processes things). So the pressure is for sure there lol.
My issue is that I discovered the forex market a little over a year ago and absolutely fell in love with trading. I've been pretty consistent in learning about the market and practicing for the whole year. I found a good strategy that *actually* works, learned to manage my emotions, and I'm now starting to see overall profits. Obviously I still have a long way to go until I could returns significant enough to provide for a family doing this, but it seems very very lucrative.
If I become a doctor, I'd finish residency about a decade from now. By then, if I had consistently been getting better at trading for a decade, I would be making much more than my salary as a physician. So, I wonder: why would I continue to waste my time practicing medicine? I think I would enjoy practicing medicine, but why would I do it while I could do something I like just as much, and make more money. On top of that, wouldn't that mean the decade in school/residency was a giant waste of time? On the other side of the argument, 95% of retail traders don't make any money, so I assume that thinking I'll be making those significant returns in 10 years may be a long shot.
It's not all about the money though. I genuinely have always seen myself as a doctor. It's almost like a personality trait. I always want to be the one to figure or what's wrong with someone, or be responsible for treating a wound. When the Covid-19 pandemic started getting bad, I felt a very strong urge to be on the front lines helping, regardless of the risk.
I've always thought it would be exciting to actually use the knowledge I learned to diagnose and treat patients. I really really like human science. To the point that I've already made some the connections that'll be taught in medical school, just because of additional research I've done to cure my curiosity. Human science is for sure my thing, so I'd think medicine should be as well.
On top of all this, I am way more inclined to study trading than to study medicine. I've studied forex information for 10-12hrs straight before and not even noticed it was already 4am. In contrast, I have to force myself to open up MCAT books (even though I love science), and detest traditional school/tests. Although, I'm the type of person that can push through and do what needs to be done, whether I like it or not.
(TLDR) In a nutshell, I love both trading and medicine. However, I'm not sure if I could balance the two together through medical school/residency, and then while actually practicing. I also doubt that I will actually continue practicing medicine if I'm making a lot of money trading. Am I being unrealistic?
Sorry this was so long, but I really need some advice/perspective on how I should move forward. Thanks for reading!!!!
submitted by VictoryLane7 to Advice [link] [comments]

To be or not to be: A doctor

I am a premed student that just finished college and is on course to start medical school next fall (2021). I've always been pretty good at school and absolutely love science. My mom is a doctor, and 2 of my siblings are also docs. I'm the youngest. I also have a few cousins that are docs. As you can probably guess, I've been kind of groomed to be a doctor. There's always quite a bit of pressure from my family to become a doctor. However, my parents put me through school with no loans and gave me pocket money so they do have a lot invested in my career choice. Also, nuclear and extended family members have always told me that out of all the kids (siblings + cousins), I specifically am the one that needs to be a doctor (due to academic ability and the way my brain processes things). So the pressure is for sure there lol.
My issue is that I discovered the forex market a little over a year ago and absolutely fell in love with trading. I've been pretty consistent in learning about the market and practicing for the whole year. I found a good strategy that *actually* works, learned to manage my emotions, and I'm now starting to see overall profits. Obviously I still have a long way to go until I could returns significant enough to provide for a family doing this, but it seems very very lucrative.
If I become a doctor, I'd finish residency about a decade from now. By then, if I had consistently been getting better at trading for a decade, I would be making much more than my salary as a physician. So, I wonder: why would I continue to waste my time practicing medicine? I think I would enjoy practicing medicine, but why would I do it while I could do something I like just as much, and make more money. On top of that, wouldn't that mean the decade in school/residency was a giant waste of time? On the other side of the argument, 95% of retail traders don't make any money, so I assume that thinking I'll be making those significant returns in 10 years may be a long shot.
It's not all about the money though. I genuinely have always seen myself as a doctor. It's almost like a personality trait. I always want to be the one to figure or what's wrong with someone, or be responsible for treating a wound. When the Covid-19 pandemic started getting bad, I felt a very strong urge to be on the front lines helping, regardless of the risk.
I've always thought it would be exciting to actually use the knowledge I learned to diagnose and treat patients. I really really like human science. To the point that I've already made some the connections that'll be taught in medical school, just because of additional research I've done to cure my curiosity. Human science is for sure my thing, so I'd think medicine should be as well.
On top of all this, I am way more inclined to study trading than to study medicine. I've studied forex information for 10-12hrs straight before and not even noticed it was already 4am. In contrast, I have to force myself to open up MCAT books (even though I love science), and detest traditional school/tests. Although, I'm the type of person that can push through and do what needs to be done, whether I like it or not.
(TLDR) In a nutshell, I love both trading and medicine. However, I'm not sure if I could balance the two together through medical school/residency, and then while actually practicing. I also doubt that I will actually continue practicing medicine if I'm making a lot of money trading. Am I being unrealistic?
Sorry this was so long, but I really need some advice/perspective on how I should move forward. Thanks for reading!!!!
submitted by VictoryLane7 to careerchange [link] [comments]

[LONG] My Story of Disillusionment with and Disappointment in the World and Myself

Intro.
This might be a long one. I hope someone reads the thing, I put like 3 hours into writing it. A brief story of my life and how it all led up to this moment, where I am disillusioned with my self-image, my life choices, and certain aspects of the world, and have no idea what to do next. Warning: this whole thing might be a little depressing to read.
Childhood.
I am a 20yo Russian male. During my childhood, I was made to believe that I am capable of doing something great and doing better than anyone. At the same time I developed a very non-conformist life stance and very often rejected things and ideas simply because they were too popular for my taste, and I couldn't feel special whilst enjoying them. Of course, in turn, society rejected me, as it does with anyone who doesn't play by the rules. Oh well.
My only redeeming quality was that I considered myself pretty smart. Which is even easier to assume, when at the same time you think that you're different from everyone else. Now, I know that to some extent, I was indeed smarter than most people in certain areas. Unlike most people I knew back then, often with bare minimum efforts I was able to maintain near perfect grades at school. I was also enjoying learning new things and reading more than an average person. So, let's just say, I had a basis to assume I was a smart dude.
I wasn't happy and content with my life, though. I never had real friends, because I only hung out with people when they were my classmates/roommates/co-workers, and after we parted ways, I rarely if ever contacted them afterwards. I always enjoyed doing things you usually do in solitude more, because when I was alone, I wouldn't be afraid that someone could hurt me for being different. Because of that, I was never in a romantic relationship.
High School.
Still, life was going okay. By the end of school, I kind of accepted my social deficiency and I wanted to focus on improving the world and become a successful person - for myself. I was facing a dilemma, though. Despite the fact that I was doing great in school, the idea of having to invest four years of my time into studying something really specific, and then having to work another 20-30 years on the same job was terrifying, because I had no idea what I liked to do! Nothing seemed interesting to me, I didn't have a passion for doing anything... Thanks to my video game addiction, which made me lazy as fuck, probably. I also needed to meet my criteria for success with my future job, which included being financially successful. I grew up in top 1% income family, so... I always felt the pressure to outperform or at least match my parents' income.
Enter trading. My dad discovered investing several years ago (we don't live in US, so most of the people aren't as financially savvy, so he never thought about investing before then). I was always curious about financial independence and markets, but now I was seeing it all done in front of me, I realized that it might be a good opportunity to make a lot of money and become successful without being socially adept, which is something absolutely required in business or politics. So, I asked my father to open a brokerage account for me in the US, and started swing trading (trading in weekly/monthly time frames). I could only trade slow and small because of the trade restrictions put on accounts <$25k and <21yo in the US. Still, it was going well, but in hindsight I was just lucky to be there during a great bull market.
Even before I thought trading and more importantly investing were the ways smart people make money. I thought simply because I was conventionally smart, I had a talent or an innate ability to pick innovative stocks and do venture investing when I grow some capital. I truly believed in that long before I was introduced to financial markets, I believed that my surface level understanding of multiple areas of cutting edge and emerging technology would give me an edge compared to all the other investors.
US Community College and Return Back.
In the end, I've decided I want to go to a US community college and study finance and become a trader and later an investor, but I didn't want to work for a fund or something like that (lazy ass). I wanted to use my knowledge and skill and my own money to grow my net worth and make a living. I didn't really like the process of trading, I just needed the money to live by while I was trying to figure out what else to do with my life. Because I thought I were smart, I thought this would come easily to me. Boy was I wrong. From the nicest of conditions in my hometown, I was suddenly moved into a foreign setting, on the other side of the planet away form my family and mates, with a video game addiction and laziness that ruined my daily routine and studying as well. The fact that I didn't like my major was not helping. My grades fell from A- in the first quarter to C+ in the last. I gained +30% from my normal weight. I was stressed out, not going outside and sitting at my computer desk for days at a time, skipping all the classes I could if they were not absolutely essential for my grades, living on prepared foods. I never got out of my shell and barely talked to anyone in English, all of my friends were Russian speaking. I wasted an opportunity to improve my speaking, although aside from that my English skills satisfy me.
By the end of community college, last summer, I was left with B grades that wouldn't let me transfer anywhere decent, and the extreme stress that I put myself through started taking a toll on my mental health. I was planning to take a break and go back to Russia for several months, and transfer back to a US uni this winter. Needless to say, you can't run from yourself. It didn't really become much better after a few months in Russia. I didn't want to study finance anymore, because it was boring and I was exhausted. I still had the video game addiction, still was lazy and gained some more extra pounds of weight. I was not sleeping at all, extremely sleep deprived for months. Because of this and lack of mental stimulation I started to become dumber. And all that was happening where I didn't really have to do anything: not study or work, just sit around the house and do whatever I wanted. Turns out, these conditions didn't help me to get out of the incoming depression.
Finally, around November, when I already sent out all of my transfer applications and already got some positive answers from several universities, I knew I didn't have much time left at home, and I had to leave soon. But I really, really didn't want to go back. It was scarier than the first time. I was afraid of new changes, I just wanted for the time to stop and letting me relax, heal... I was having suicidal thoughts and talked about it with my family and my therapist. They were all supportive and helped me as much as they could. But I was the only person who could really help myself. If I wanted to breathe freely, I had to admit defeat and not go back to the US to continue my education. It was extremely hard at first, but then I just let go. I decided to find a temporary job as an English tutor and give myself time to think. Then I remembered that I had a bunch of money in my trading account. I still thought that I was pretty smart, despite failing college, so I figured, why not try move it to Russian brokers who don't have trading restrictions, and do it full time? Which is exactly what I did. And I started to study trading all by myself at a fast pace. I was now trading full time and it was going sideways: +10% in December, -20% in January. Then, something incredible happened. I was already in a shitty place in life, but I still had some hope for my future. Things were about to get much worse. I'm in the late January, and I discovered for myself that the whole financial industry of the world was a fraud.
Brief Explanation of My Discoveries.
In the image of the financial industry, there are several levels of perceived credibility.
In the bottom tier, there is pure gambling. In my country, there were periods when binary options trading and unreliable Forex brokers were popular among common folk, but these were obvious and unsophisticated fraudsters who were one step away from being prosecuted. There are also cryptocurrencies that don't hold any value and are also used only for speculation/redistribution of wealth. There is also a wonderful gambling subreddit wallstreetbets where most users don't even try to hide the fact that what they are doing is pure gambling. I love it. But the thing is, this is trading/investing for the people who have no idea what it is, and most people discredit it as a fraud, which it, indeed, is. These examples are 99% marketing/public image and 1% finance. But these offer x10-1000 returns in the shortest time span. Typical get-rich-quick schemes, but they attract attention.
Then, there is trading tier. You can have multiple sub levels here, in the bottom of this tier we would probably have complex technical analysis (indicators) and daily trading/scalping. I was doing this in the DecembeJanuary. At the top would be people who do fundamental analysis (study financial reports) and position trade (monthly time frames). Now, there is constant debate in the trading community whether technical analysis or fundamental analysis is better. I have a solid answer to the question. They work in the same way. Or rather, they don't work at all.
You'd ask: "Why you didn't discover this earlier? You were in this financial thing for several years now!" Well, you see, unlike on the previous level, here millions of people say that they actually believe trading works and there is a way to use the available tools to have great returns. Some of these people actually know that trading doesn't work, but they benefit from other traders believing in it, because they can sell them courses or take brokerage fees from them. Still, when there are millions around you telling you that it works, even a non-conformist like me would budge. Not that many people actually participate in the markets, so I thought that by being in this minority made me smart and protected from fraudsters. Lol. All it took for me to discover the truth is to accidentally discover that some technical indicators give random results, do a few google searches, reach some scientific studies which are freely available and prove that technical and fundamental analysis don't work. It was always in front of me, but the fucking trading community plugged my ears and closed my eyes shut so I wasn't able to see it. Trading usually promises 3-15% gain a month.
A huge shock, but surely there was still a way for me to work this out? Active investing it is!
The next level, active investing, is different from trading. You aim for 15-50% yearly returns, but you don't have to do as much work. You hold on to stocks of your choice for years at a time, once in a while you study the markets, re balance your portfolio, etc. Or you invest your money in a fund, that will select the stocks of their choice and manage their and your portfolio for you. For a small fee of course. All of these actions are aimed at trying to outperform the gain the market made as a whole, and so called index funds, which invest in basically everything and follow the market returns - about 7-10% a year. And if I ever had any doubts in trading, I firmly believed that active investing works since I was a little kid (yes I knew about it back then). And this is where the real fraud comes in.
The whole Wall Street and every broker, every stock exchange in the world are a part of a big fraud. Only about 10-20% of professional fund managers outperform the market in any 15 year period. If you take 30 years, this dwindles to almost nothing, which means that no one can predict the markets. These people have no idea what they are doing. Jim Cramer is pure show-business and has no idea what's going on. Warren Buffet gained his fortune with pure luck, and for every Buffet there are some people who made only a million bucks and countless folks who lost everything.
Wall Street. They have trillions of dollars and use all that money and power and marketing to convince you that there is a way to predict where the stocks are going without being a legal insider or somehow abusing the law. They will make you think you can somehow learn from them where to invest your money on your own or they will make you believe that you should just give it to them and they will manage it for you, because they know how everything works and they can predict the future using past data.
They won't. They don't. They can't. There are studies and statistics to prove it countless times over the span of a 100 years. But they will still charge you exchange fees, brokerage fees and management fees anyway. And they also manipulate certain studies, lobby where and when they need it, and spread misinformation on an unprecedented scale, creating a positive image of themselves. And everyone falls for that. Billions of people around the globe still think it's all legit.
Passive index investing is the last level. You just put your money in the market and wait. Markets will go up at a predetermined rate. If there's a crisis, in 10 years no one will even remember. Markets always go up in the end. But passive index investing can only give you only 7% inflation-adjusted returns a year. Not enough to stop working or even retire early, unless you have a high-paying job in a first-world country. I don't.
Despite all that, to put it simply, this is the only type of investing that works and doesn't involve any kind of fraud or gambling. It's the type of investing that will give you the most money. If you want to know why it is like that and how to do it, just go to financialindependence. They know this stuff better than any other sub. Better than investing, trading or any other sub where non-passive-index investing is still discussed as viable strategy.
Back to me.
My whole being was fucked over, my hopes and dreams and understanding of success and how this world works were shattered. I realized, I had no future in financial industry, because only middlemen make money in there, and I quit college needed to get there. Frankly, I wouldn't want to work there even if I had the opportunity. The pay is good, but the job is boring and I wouldn't want to be a part of this giant scheme anyway. But even if I wanted to go back, I also couldn't. Russia is in a worsening crisis and my parents could no longer afford a US university and now with coronavirus it's even worse. Good thing I quit before it all happened. I learned a valuable lesson and didn't lose that much money for it (only about 10% of my savings). God knows where it would lead me if I continued to be delusional. But now that my last temporary plans for the future were scrapped, I had no idea what to do next.
The future.
With the reality hitting me, I would lie if I say it didn't all come full circle and connect to my past. I realized that I was stupid and not intelligent, because I was living in a made-up world for years now. But even if I were intelligent, pure wit would not give me the success and fortune that I was craving, because trading and active investing were a no-go for me, and business/politics require a very different, extroverted mindset, different education and interest from my own. My only redeeming quality in a hopeless introvert world, my perceived intelligence was taken away from me and rendered useless at the same time.
Besides, failing at that one thing made me insecure about everything and now I think of myself as an average individual. So, if 8 out of 10 businesses fail, I shouldn't start one because I will probably fail. And if most politicians don't get anywhere, why should I bother? If average salary in my country is X, I shouldn't hope for more. I stopped believing in my ability to achieve something. First, I failed at education and now I failed... Professionally? I don't know how to describe it, but my life recently was just an emotional roller coaster. I just feel like a very old person and all I want calmness and stability in my life. I was very lazy before just because, but now I feel like I also don't want to do anything because I feel I would just fail. It feels better now I don't have to worry about trading anymore and I got rid of that load... But I am still miserable and perhaps worse than ever, maybe I just don't understand and feel it because I've become slow and numb. The only positive thing that happened to me recently, is that I finally started losing weight and about 1/4 of the way back to my normal weight.
As for my future, am looking at several possibilities here. So far the parents are allowing my miserable life to continue and they let me live with them and buy me food. I don't need anything else right now. But it can't go on like this forever. The thought of having a mundane low-paying job in this shithole of a country depresses me. I will probably temporarily do English tutoring if there's demand for such work. My old school friends want me to help them in their business and my dad wants me to help him in his, I and probably should, but I feel useless, pathetic and incapable of doing anything of value. And business just seems boring, difficult and too stressful for me right now. Just not my cup of tea.
I am also looking at creative work. I love video games, music, films and other forms of art. I love the games most though, so I am looking into game dev. I don't really like programming, I have learned some during school years, but the pay would probably be higher for a programmer than an creator of any kind of art. However, I think I would enjoy art creation much more, but I don't have any experience in drawing and only some limited experience in music production. And I am not one of these kids who always had a scrapbook with them at school. Having to make another life choice paralyzes me. I am leaning towards art. I don't feel confident in my ability to learn this skill from scratch, but I think it's my best shot at finding a job that would make me happy.
So perhaps, when this whole pandemic is over, I'll go to Europe and get my degree, get a job there and stay. American Dream is dead to me, and Europe is cheaper, closer, safe and comfortable. Just the thing for a person who feels like they are thrice their real age.
Outro.
Thanks for coming to my TED Talk. Special thanks if you read the whole thing, it means a whole lot to me, an internet stranger. But even if no one reads it, feels good to get this off my chest. I actually cried during writing some parts. Holy shit, this might be the longest and smartest looking thing my dumbed down head could manage to generate since college. I hope that you're having a great day. Stay healthy and be careful during this fucking pandemic. All the best.
submitted by OberV0lt to TrueOffMyChest [link] [comments]

Should I alter my career path?

I am a premed student that just finished college and is on course to start medical school next fall (2021). I've always been pretty good at school and absolutely love science. My mom is a doctor, and 2 of my siblings are also docs. I'm the youngest. I also have a few cousins that are docs. As you can probably guess, I've been kind of groomed to be a doctor. There's always quite a bit of pressure from my family to become a doctor. However, my parents put me through school with no loans and gave me pocket money so they do have a lot invested in my career choice. Also, nuclear and extended family members have always told me that out of all the kids (siblings + cousins), I specifically am the one that needs to be a doctor (due to academic ability and the way my brain processes things). So the pressure is for sure there lol.
My issue is that I discovered the forex market a little over a year ago and absolutely fell in love with trading. I've been pretty consistent in learning about the market and practicing for the whole year. I found a good strategy that *actually* works, learned to manage my emotions, and I'm now starting to see overall profits. Obviously I still have a long way to go until I could returns significant enough to provide for a family doing this, but it seems very very lucrative.
If I become a doctor, I'd finish residency about a decade from now. By then, if I had consistently been getting better at trading for a decade, I would be making much more than my salary as a physician. So, I wonder: why would I continue to waste my time practicing medicine? I think I would enjoy practicing medicine, but why would I do it while I could do something I like just as much, and make more money. On top of that, wouldn't that mean the decade in school/residency was a giant waste of time? On the other side of the argument, 95% of retail traders don't make any money, so I assume that thinking I'll be making those significant returns in 10 years may be a long shot.
It's not all about the money though. I genuinely have always seen myself as a doctor. It's almost like a personality trait. I always want to be the one to figure or what's wrong with someone, or be responsible for treating a wound. When the Covid-19 pandemic started getting bad, I felt a very strong urge to be on the front lines helping, regardless of the risk.
I've always thought it would be exciting to actually use the knowledge I learned to diagnose and treat patients. I really really like human science. To the point that I've already made some the connections that'll be taught in medical school, just because of additional research I've done to cure my curiosity. Human science is for sure my thing, so I'd think medicine should be as well.
On top of all this, I am way more inclined to study trading than to study medicine. I've studied forex information for 10-12hrs straight before and not even noticed it was already 4am. In contrast, I have to force myself to open up MCAT books (even though I love science), and detest traditional school/tests. Although, I'm the type of person that can push through and do what needs to be done, whether I like it or not.
(TLDR) In a nutshell, I love both trading and medicine. However, I'm not sure if I could balance the two together through medical school/residency, and then while actually practicing. I also doubt that I will actually continue practicing medicine if I'm making a lot of money trading. Am I being unrealistic?
Sorry this was so long, but I really need some advice/perspective on how I should move forward. Thanks for reading!!!!
FYI: I understand that FX is not at all a get rich quick kind of thing. I'm more than willing to put in the work and I have been for the past year. also I trade for a prop firm with a scaling plan. I trader money and get some of the profits. So I wouldn't be using my own money for a while
submitted by VictoryLane7 to careerguidance [link] [comments]

Should I alter my career path?

I am a premed student that just finished college and is on course to start medical school next fall (2021). I've always been pretty good at school and absolutely love science. My mom is a doctor, and 2 of my siblings are also docs. I'm the youngest. I also have a few cousins that are docs. As you can probably guess, I've been kind of groomed to be a doctor. There's always quite a bit of pressure from my family to become a doctor. However, my parents put me through school with no loans and gave me pocket money so they do have a lot invested in my career choice. Also, nuclear and extended family members have always told me that out of all the kids (siblings + cousins), I specifically am the one that needs to be a doctor (due to academic ability and the way my brain processes things). So the pressure is for sure there lol.
My issue is that I discovered the forex market a little over a year ago and absolutely fell in love with trading. I've been pretty consistent in learning about the market and practicing for the whole year. I found a good strategy that *actually* works, learned to manage my emotions, and I'm now starting to see overall profits. Obviously I still have a long way to go until I could returns significant enough to provide for a family doing this, but it seems very very lucrative.
If I become a doctor, I'd finish residency about a decade from now. By then, if I had consistently been getting better at trading for a decade, I would be making much more than my salary as a physician. So, I wonder: why would I continue to waste my time practicing medicine? I think I would enjoy practicing medicine, but why would I do it while I could do something I like just as much, and make more money. On top of that, wouldn't that mean the decade in school/residency was a giant waste of time? On the other side of the argument, 95% of retail traders don't make any money, so I assume that thinking I'll be making those significant returns in 10 years may be a long shot.
It's not all about the money though. I genuinely have always seen myself as a doctor. It's almost like a personality trait. I always want to be the one to figure or what's wrong with someone, or be responsible for treating a wound. When the Covid-19 pandemic started getting bad, I felt a very strong urge to be on the front lines helping, regardless of the risk.
I've always thought it would be exciting to actually use the knowledge I learned to diagnose and treat patients. I really really like human science. To the point that I've already made some the connections that'll be taught in medical school, just because of additional research I've done to cure my curiosity. Human science is for sure my thing, so I'd think medicine should be as well.
On top of all this, I am way more inclined to study trading than to study medicine. I've studied forex information for 10-12hrs straight before and not even noticed it was already 4am. In contrast, I have to force myself to open up MCAT books (even though I love science), and detest traditional school/tests. Although, I'm the type of person that can push through and do what needs to be done, whether I like it or not.
(TLDR) In a nutshell, I love both trading and medicine. However, I'm not sure if I could balance the two together through medical school/residency, and then while actually practicing. I also doubt that I will actually continue practicing medicine if I'm making a lot of money trading. Am I being unrealistic?
Sorry this was so long, but I really need some advice/perspective on how I should move forward. Thanks for reading!!!!
FYI: I understand that FX is not at all a get rich quick kind of thing. I'm more than willing to put in the work and I have been for the past year. also I trade for a prop firm with a scaling plan. I trader money and get some of the profits. So I wouldn't be using my own money for a while
submitted by VictoryLane7 to careerguidance [link] [comments]

Should I alter my career path?

I am a premed student that just finished college and is on course to start medical school next fall (2021). I've always been pretty good at school and absolutely love science. My mom is a doctor, and 2 of my siblings are also docs. I'm the youngest. I also have a few cousins that are docs. As you can probably guess, I've been kind of groomed to be a doctor. There's always quite a bit of pressure from my family to become a doctor. However, my parents put me through school with no loans and gave me pocket money so they do have a lot invested in my career choice. Also, nuclear and extended family members have always told me that out of all the kids (siblings + cousins), I specifically am the one that needs to be a doctor (due to academic ability and the way my brain processes things). So the pressure is for sure there lol.
My issue is that I discovered the forex market a little over a year ago and absolutely fell in love with trading. I've been pretty consistent in learning about the market and practicing for the whole year. I found a good strategy that *actually* works, learned to manage my emotions, and I'm now starting to see overall profits. Obviously I still have a long way to go until I could returns significant enough to provide for a family doing this, but it seems very very lucrative.
If I become a doctor, I'd finish residency about a decade from now. By then, if I had consistently been getting better at trading for a decade, I would be making much more than my salary as a physician. So, I wonder: why would I continue to waste my time practicing medicine? I think I would enjoy practicing medicine, but why would I do it while I could do something I like just as much, and make more money. On top of that, wouldn't that mean the decade in school/residency was a giant waste of time? On the other side of the argument, 95% of retail traders don't make any money, so I assume that thinking I'll be making those significant returns in 10 years may be a long shot.
It's not all about the money though. I genuinely have always seen myself as a doctor. It's almost like a personality trait. I always want to be the one to figure or what's wrong with someone, or be responsible for treating a wound. When the Covid-19 pandemic started getting bad, I felt a very strong urge to be on the front lines helping, regardless of the risk.
I've always thought it would be exciting to actually use the knowledge I learned to diagnose and treat patients. I really really like human science. To the point that I've already made some the connections that'll be taught in medical school, just because of additional research I've done to cure my curiosity. Human science is for sure my thing, so I'd think medicine should be as well.
On top of all this, I am way more inclined to study trading than to study medicine. I've studied forex information for 10-12hrs straight before and not even noticed it was already 4am. In contrast, I have to force myself to open up MCAT books (even though I love science), and detest traditional school/tests. Although, I'm the type of person that can push through and do what needs to be done, whether I like it or not.
(TLDR) In a nutshell, I love both trading and medicine. However, I'm not sure if I could balance the two together through medical school/residency, and then while actually practicing. I also doubt that I will actually continue practicing medicine if I'm making a lot of money trading. Am I being unrealistic?
Sorry this was so long, but I really need some advice/perspective on how I should move forward. Thanks for reading!!!!
FYI: I understand that FX is not at all a get rich quick kind of thing. I'm more than willing to put in the work and I have been for the past year. also I trade for a prop firm with a scaling plan. I trader money and get some of the profits. So I wouldn't be using my own money for a while
submitted by VictoryLane7 to careerguidance [link] [comments]

Prop Trading

Directed here from Forex
I’m in the process of applying for internships at prop firms and have received invitations to online and first round interviews. I'm relatively new to the trading world and given the nature of the industry, there’s very little information online.
My question is: what makes a top tier firm better than a mid tier firm?
Hypothetically, let’s use Belvedere (mid) and Jump (top) as our two examples. Other than an increase in the base salary with Jump, isn’t the compensation structure still the same? Won’t you be receiving the same bonus amount if your performance is the same at both locations? Do traders at "better" firms trade with more capital? I’m aware that the level of mentors/coaches is higher at Jump but there are very skilled traders at Belvedere as well. What other factors make Jump such a prestigious prop shop?
Hope my question(s) makes sense. I can clarify further if needed. Any and all help would be appreciated.
Edit: Also, because everyone likes a little insight into the poster’s history, I go to a top target school in the Midwest pursuing a business major. GPA is ehhh but my school has a strong enough alumni connection to get me past the resume screening process. Jump is unattainable but its prestigious status interests me immensely.
submitted by denvergee to FinancialCareers [link] [comments]

MT7: ONE STOP SHOP TO ADDRESSING CRITICAL EXCHANGE CHALLENGES

Digital forms of money have their expectations significantly dependent on trades. Following the quest for continued existence, there is a constant need for them to be continuously traded and exchanging them is a better approach to attain this. In any case, current trade exchanges have not been that efficient and satisfactory, hence the conceptualization of the revolutionary masternet to nip the problem in the bud. However, to add more impetus to the work of masternet, the developers made another huge contribution to the crypto circle. With its fresh out of the box new crypto exchange recently made public to further address these gluts of challenges, and to say the least, it had actually offered confidence to its quest for a better crypto exchange. Basically, MT7 is the trade set up by Masternet to gauge exchanges. It is of critical significance to the crypto world; Masternet Trading 7 (MT7) stage is a better variation to what was had on MT6 and is here to offer that gap that has been missing.
MASTERNET'S ROLE In the light of irregularities on well-known exchange infrastructures, Masternet took a crucial decision to make its voice heard. It had discharged Akasic Global that had in stock, some of the most intriguing and value-laded fundamental apparatus that made crypto exchanges conceivable. Basically, the developers just presented an exchanging framework that will on no small measure incorporate better features recorded on Akasic Global. The last guaranteed to have bots for robotized exchanges and other stunning highlights, for example, DApps and commercial center but the question is will MT7 breath life into these? WHAT IS MT7? This isn't the standard exchanging stage, however, is one that will change the substance of digital currencies that are being traded on various exchanges. To this end, what we have here is an advanced one that will lay belief to dealers' infrastructure and have them acquire gainfully.
It is at the top of the priority list to add more impetus for merchants by upgrading their experiences. In the first place, there are solid moves to enhance benefits as it is dynamically developed. Then again, you get the chance to appreciate the advantages that accompany computerized exchanges.
PHENOMENAL EXCHANGE PLATFORM
Trusted experts in the exchange ecosystem is optimistic that this will change the course of history. Indeed, even on fiat cash trades (FOREX), executing from the dreamland had not been conceivable. In any case, this has been had been made possible via the instrumentality of this platform. Among its various standing, MT7 ensures that requests can be set physically. In the event that you in anyway need to keep away from the hitches that accompany this, there is a second alternative – robotization. The thought is that exchanges can take a shot at autopilot if the necessary and important setups have been made.
To this end, there are two varieties to executing on the trade – manual and automatic. For the previous, a merchant needs to make orders for each exchange session. The last mentioned (programmed) stipulates that exchanges can be continued after the programmed mode had been turned on. In the light of this, you can set up the component and keeping in mind that you're sleeping away endlessly, your exchanges will be coordinated and benefits collected to that impact. There is likewise an exchanging bot that matches exchanges and furthermore helps in gaining benefits. You can set this up to profit by week after week reward dispensed to dealers.
IMPROVED UX Clients have not been really satisfied with what they got from past trades. For example, a portion of these have interfaces that leave dealers scratching their heads to appreciate what is before their screens. To this end, MT7 has in stock, an easy to use interface that can be gotten to on the web and portable platforms. The suggestion is that there are portable applications for this trade the same way Binance has in stock.
QUICKER TRADERS Crypto dealers are not on trades to keep a tab on the red light until the point that it turns green. There are constantly bullish minutes when a crypto coin will, in general, do well and it is at such occasions that brokers will in general win more. On MT7, you have a boundless stream of salary whether the market standing is great or not. To this end, brokers that may be intrigued to make use of the platform are guaranteed boundless benefit for each exchange. So also, fair exchanges are encouraged inside 5 seconds similarly as withdraw and deposit services are directed progressively and in actual-time. At last, there is throughout the day an online help infrastructure to take care of inquiries relating to utilizing the trade exchanges.
PAYMENTS: Various doors have been contracted to deal with record subsidizing of each broker. Profit can likewise be pulled back through bolstered payment channels. REWARD
MECHANISM To keep clients steadfast, MT7 has put in place a reward framework that sees to even dissemination of benefits among merchants in the same cycle. This means exchanges will be sorted into cycles and brokers that partake here will share gathered benefit among themselves. Interestingly, the number of people included will be lessened; making it conceivable to gain more.
IB REWARD The primary reward system is the IB Rewards. The thought behind this is clients are relied upon to buy 1000 PINS each week. This is additionally gathered into levels that stipulate gaining rewards from referred merchants.
For each dealer you allude to the trade, you get 0.2% of the IB Reward comparable. With this, groups can be figured and the main merchant that welcomed others will in general gain from them for being referred.
MAIN CONCERN MT7 is maybe the most reasonable an significant trade exchange platform on the globe that has put on place a value proposition for its client’s advancement. By all standard, the MT7 platform is the exchanging infrastructure leveraging on the blockchain technology to bring the cryptocurrencies needs to fore for better efficiency, transparency and critical solutions to exchanges.
For more insight and further enquiries, please click on the following links;
Masternet website : https://masternet.io/
Akasic Website: https://akasic.network/
MT7 Information: https://medium.com/@masternet.io/mt7-trading-platform-explore-the-era-of-progressive-trading-3e1bd178fab4
Author's Bitcointalk Username: Jannyh Bitcointalk Profile Link: https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?action=profile;u=1883625
submitted by janny4d to IcoInvestor [link] [comments]

Exciting news for fraudsters and hackers: now the bail can be paid in cryptocurrency

Also on this weekend digest: the new crypto index by China, crypto exchanges still make a ton of money, and new problems in Venezuela.
https://finrazor.com/news/exciting-news-for-fraudsters-and-hackers-now-the-bail-can-be-paid-in-cryptocurrency
submitted by Anastasia_Dream to btc [link] [comments]

Instant Trading Profits review - Does It Really Work or Scam?

Instant Trading Profits is a newly release binary options trading software. I already got my copy. Today I am going to write an honest Instant Trading Profits review to help those people out who want to trade with binary options. So read my Instant Trading Profits review.
Instant Trading Profits review - What is Instant Trading Profits?
Instant Trading Profits is a sort of Binary option trading software that you can download specifically to your desktop. It deals with the rule where you need to choose whether the cost of an advantage will go up or down in the following sixty seconds. All that you have to think about the trade and all the pointers are held in this one software thus you don't need to go around searching for them on a few sites.
What you have to do here is that you have to choose if the estimation of the advantage will go up or down when you hit the tab. This is finished with the utilization of two tabs: "Call" or "PUT".
• You hit call when you think the estimation of a certain benefit will expand in the following sixty second.
• You hit call when you think the estimation of a certain benefit will expand in the following sixty second.
When this is carried out, you sit tight for 60 seconds for the result! This is all that you have to do and it will guarantee that you begin profiting.
Instant Trading Profits Review - Does it really earn money?
We're distrustful reviewers along these lines commonly, we felt a bit concerned by the fantastic cases made by the producers of Instant Trading Profits ,thus we were dead set to put it under a test.
What's more sincerely, what would we be able to say? We were basically ASTONISHED at the astounding results we got from testing this item. In case you're considering contributing, then you ought to without a doubt attempt your fortunes with Instant Trading Profits to help you begin.
We acknowledge what you are considering. Is this item only one more con like such a variety of other financing items has ended up being previously? Obviously, you have numerous motivations to be suspicious, however the extent that Instant Trading Profits is concerned you don't simply take our pledge for it. Instant Trading Profits has gotten top stamps in various reviews from authoratitive sites – it truly does satisfy its claims. With an endorsement rate of just about 98%, this simply can't be a scam.
How Does Instant Trading Profits Work?
If you don't mind NOTE this critical thing that in the event that you visit the dealer site straightforwardly and store the cash there then you will most likely not be permitted to get to the software in any circumstances. The most ideal approach to get access to it is: Step 1 : Visit the authority site here.
Step 2: Fill your email ID in the box given on the page.
Step 3: After that, you will be taken to Instant Trading Profits parts zone where you will discover a few directions to store cash in your Broker account. Just click that flag.
Step 4: Once you have stored the cash, you will be permitted to get to the Instant Trading Profits Software?
Pros:
• 100% Automated trading signals
• About 73.8% winning signals that is well enough
• User friendly for experts trader as well as beginner
Cons:
• 100% winning signals is not guaranteed but 74% is the rate you are going to have with Instant Trading Profits.
Bottom Line:
Instant Trading Profits is doubtlessly an unquestionable requirement have item on the off chance that you need to profit from trading Binary Options. You ought to be mindful that forex trading is a massively beneficial Liam White set and it is getting greater and greater. By utilizing at once Trading Profits framework and software, it spares your time to rapidly benefit from trading. This is truly profit. In the event that you strive to create any salary on the web, you ought to try this out.
Instant Trading Profits review, Instant Trading Profits Scam, Instant Trading Profits Proof, Instant Trading Profits results,
submitted by malamalt to malamalt [link] [comments]

[Table] IAmA Goldman Sachs Investment Banker AMAA

Verified? (This bot cannot verify AMAs just yet)
Date: 2013-01-12
Link to submission (Has self-text)
Link to my post
Questions Answers
I have a good friend who is a VP at your firm . They blamed the entire Financial crisis on ' poor people who could not afford their mortgages ' they said this was pretty much he opinion among the investment banks . How do you feel about what happened to Greece and Goldmans hand in it ? That is not true. Opinion is very much split within the investment banks and there is no right or wrong answer. I personally don't believe at all that the crisis was caused by 'poor people' - and I don't like that sort of categorization of people in the first place. There are perhaps 15/20 different institutions you could blame for the crisis, there's no way of isolating individuals. I'm not sure what exactly you think GS's hand in the Greece affair was. Of course it's a sad story and I feel remorseful - I recently donated £50,000 at a charity ball to help rebuild one of the islands which has almost been burned to the ground. But ultimately Greece employed GS at the time because they wanted to fudge their finances so as to meet entry requirements for the Euro i.e. the greek government was knowingly employing GS to help perform an extremely risky task - GS didn't force anything upon them. If the experiment explodes 10 years later (as it did), should GS really be the party to blame?
The next day, you are flipping through television channels and randomly come across a pre-season CFL game between the Toronto Argonauts and the Saskatchewan Roughriders. Knowing your inevitable future, do you now watch it? Yes of course i fucking do. The future is inevitable. Chuck Klosterman i like your name.
I love seeing the ignorance that emerges in these AMA's relating to investment bankers. I am really interested in a career in either IB or Consulting, have a few questions for you. Thank you to fletch below for answering this question.
1) How did you cope with the hours? I like working hard, I like working for my money but I also like enjoying free time and having a social life. When working a 100 hours as an analyst that would certainly have to suffer 2)What were you academic results like through your degree? I'm currently in my second year and will be realistically looking at 2.2, 2.2, 2.1 and 2.1 (years 1-4). This summer I'd hope to get an accountancy internship in one of the big 4 followed by an internship next year in one of the large IBs. I know there's more to a candidate than solely their academic credentials + internship but would this stand me well for a BB in London? (Top Irish university, undergrad will be in Business and French) 3) What is it that makes you enjoy this job? I know the paycheck is certainly a bonus but you've said there's more to it than that? Whatever your breakdown between modules is, you need a 2.1 overall. Even if your average is 60% or 61%, that's enough to get you past the minimum requirements and through to interviews. After that it's up to you - they'll take someone with a good business mind and strong communications skills irrespective of whether they average 60 or 78 or 92. I disagree with him. My job is extremely rewarding and i wouldn't swap it for any other industry at the moment. If you want evidence of people enjoying their jobs look at the number of years they spend at their respective firms. Most of the partners at GS are 'home-grown' and have spent 20/30 years sweating away but don't regret it for a second.
Do you realize that in countries like Spain you're seen as an evil person that only wants to get profit and don't have any soul or feelings and probably kicks puppies for fun? If so, how do you feel about it? Yes and understand their anger but it should be re-directed to politicians!
Proof? and of course... how much did you make in 2012 approximately? Approx 600k. How do upload proof e.g. photo evidence?
Sorry, new to reddit!
Do you have free ticket for me? Always looking for handouts. What is it young people say, lolz??
I'm very curious of your opinion of Secretary Geithner's role in LIBOR. Do you think he was guilty? innocent? Thanks! LIBOR scandal is way too complicated to explain at 2.30 am after a few beers. Many active players are implicated and i think he will be seen in the wrong eventually like many others.
What hours do you work? Approx 80 hours a week not incl. flight time I go to festivals in Europe but would love to go it. Do you have free ticket for me?
If the concept and idea of a monetary system was replaced with something better (hypothetically) what would you do? As in for a career or what not since now you are jobless. Resources will always be scarce so someone will have to ensure an optimal allocation. There will always be a market of some kind whether it be a public market or an internal government one.
Hypothetically we could have unlimited power, molecular production, and master matteenergy conversion. Would that change your answer? Good interview question. I'll keep it in mind.
In your view, are there any regulations that could meaningfully alter the moral hazard typified by the 2008-2009 bailout of the financial sector? If so, what might they be? And if not, to what extent does regulatory capture play a role? Regulatory capture is a seriously problem not just in banking e.g. also in the energy business. How do you reduce it? It won't happen unless the public demand it, as everyone with power tends to benefit from it and so they won't make meaningful steps to change anything, i.e. its a win win situation for government and business. However it needs more than just 'occupy movements' but rather i am talking the mass voter population.
Have you seen @gselevator on twitter? if so have you ever contributed/is it legit? Haha yes i have seen it and no its not legit, well at least i think its not. Seriously though the elevator chats can be quite entertaining and revealing.
Do you use a mouse when you work on excel? Are you joking?
No.
In your opinion, do you think the money you make is worth the hell that you go through to make it? I love my job and so i am lucky that the money is not the only motivator.
But yes i love checking my bank balance at an atm.
How can i break into finance with a sub-par gpa? Network and try non BB firms.
A company founded by 100 duck sized horses. or A company founded by 1 horse sized duck? 100 duck sized horses every time. Basic risk management theory - don't put all your eggs in one basket. If that 1 horse sized duck isn't exceptional, your business is going down the tubes.
Prior to the collapse, did you have any idea what was about to happen? It was getting obvious that there was a bubble, but never predicted how great the fallout would be and that in 2013 we would still be suffering
What do you do day to day? I work in the energy field in Europe but don't want to get too specific. Day to day we advise natural resource companies on all things financial such as m&a and financing strategy and then execute on their behalf. So I am on the corporate finance side rather than sales and trading. However I work closely with the syndication and sales guys such as if we are executing an IPO or a follow-on share offering.
I have a buddy who's small but established clean tech company needs money building biodiesel manufacturing plants around the US that run off garbage and wood chips. The technology is actually coming from a company based in Sweden. Can you help him on the money side? Send me a link to their website.
I find clean tech very interesting.
How did you get your job? Did a summer internship then got FT conversion.
What college did you go to? I went to LSE (university in the UK)
What jobs did you work before getting this one? Did another internship whilst at university at an oil company.
At what age did you get this job? 22.
I hear the GS company culture is like " a frat on steriods" true or false? False more than true but depends on team.
Is it as cut throat as I have heard with the bottom 50% of people getting sacked each year to make way for new guys who will probably be sacked the year after? Bottom 5% is more accurate. 7-8% in a bad year, 3-4% in a good year. It's a fine line between 'cut throat' and having a 'healthy competitive atmosphere'. But we'd be out of business very quickly if we kept firing half of our staff every year...
Is there any stock I should look into in 2013? Long term or short term. Short term- African Barrick Gold. The chinese walked away and so the share price plunged and despite serious operational issues, the massive drop has presented a golden buying opportunity.
Long term- anything to avoid inflation, inflation scares the crap out of me and is going to be a big problem in the Uk and elsewhere in the future.
Also buy into soft commodity boom e.g. meat in africa, think zambeef etc if you can find an attractive entry point.
What's the best preparation for an interview with an i-bank? I'm over here in the states and come from a non-target. Read WSO, the forums are full of useful hints and tips especially for non target guys. Depending on what area you are applying for, make sure you know some really good examples and stock pitches as it is amazing how many candidates lack knowledge e.g. if applying for ECM for god sakes know some of the recent IPO's and likewise for equity research have good stock pitches and have conviction when presenting. Best of luck!
How important is your undergrad majogpa I'm double majoring in Econ/Conflict resolution studies with a possible minor in poly sci (depending on how the credits work out) I got a 3.9 gpa last semester but it only brought my overall gpa to a 2.4 because fuck klonopin. I should have at least a 3.0 by graduation, but I'm wondering its worth it to pay for and retake my first semester. Can I have $373 dollars? :D :D I promise only to get moderately drunk with this money. Sorry, a lot of questions, thanks for answering. Oh also, one last thing, all else being equal, is calc I enough math to apply for analyst job? or do I need more? Undergrad course choice is not that important for IBD but obviously for more quant roles you need maths skills Again i am sorry but i am not very clued up on GPA Ok i give you money but first you have to register yourself as a charity so that you can gift aid it and get much more!
Where did you go to college? LSE.
As an undergrad? How hard was it? I hear it's very difficult. Yes, undergrad.
Harder than most places depending on your course. Especially as you are competing with loads of kids from Asia who do extra calculus to relax.
How do you see regulation affecting the overall banking culture? Everything I have been reading and what people have been saying is that the culture is changing. Have you been seeing this? I recommend reading "The Culture of Success" by Lisa Endlich.
Also how do you like the goldman culture? Regulation is hurting us...but: Link to business.financialpost.com
How much total did you make in each of your years at the firm? I don't want to get into specifics.
But for your first three years as an analyst roughly 50k-70k (£ not $)
As an associate 120k-160k.
After that the numbers get exciting.
What tools do you use on a regular basis? Excel, Outlook, Excel, Outlook, Excel, Outlook...powerpoint.
What is the biggest reward of working in IB? Where I study, students with high grades are pushed to chase the prestigious internships firms like GS, MS, etc offer. Their reasoning why they chase these jobs is that they think it is the highest (prestige) in finance they can go or are attracted by the money. It seems shallow to me. What does IB offer that makes your career personally fulfilling? Why didn't you choose to work elsewhere? I find what i do at the front end of the energy sector fascinating. If your interested in business or globalisation or other similiar areas then IBD is pretty much at the cutting edge of it.
Thanks for the reply! When you were first starting out at GS, were you able to balance a personal life aside from your work? Has it gotten easier as you have gained more experience? Would you recommend IB as a field to pursue to your own children today? Thanks again! I'd say during my first 3 years as an analyst the 'balance' was almost non-existent i.e. i was regularly working 100+ hours/week. Since then it's become easier year by year and i think that's true for most. And yes certainly i would encourage my children to pursue it - not that i have any yet.
Where did you go to uni what was your gpa? how many physics majors work their? did you start off as an intern? sorry for rapid firing questions. LSE (london school of economics) - first class honours but don't know how that translates into GPA.
I know only 3/4 physics majors in the office at the moment.
Yes started as an intern.
Do banker run the world? how much political influence do they really have? It works two ways. Some bankers have their fingers in politics in a way they perhaps shouldn't. But equally many politicians have their fingers in banking and can force our hands.
How hard is it for a non ivy leager studying finance to get an entry level job at GS? what about internships? Tough. But with enough internship experience beforehand it's possible.
What do you think of Forex? Would you ever trade on it with your personal money? Difficult to answer - you can trade forex in a million different ways - some ways are more interesting than others. I don't personally trade it, but others forge a very successful career out of it.
What was your bets investment in? (If that's how it works) That's not really my role in IBD.
But outside GS I invested in the Shanghai property market a decade ago or so. My 4 flats there are now worth 10-12 times what they were worth then.
WTF caused the 2010 flash crash? Good question. Nobody knows for sure.
From the link you've provided, I find no.2 the most plausible explanation. But I would also add 6. UBS did something stupid again.
As hardcore capitalists what is your feeling about (management of) banks that seem to live under the impression that profits are for a happy few while losses should be carried by tax-payers? That's not what I believe at all.
And by the way all of us are tax payers too. The top 5% contribute approx. 50% of the government's taxation revenue. So if losses are being 'carried by tax-payers' - that doesn't exclude people in the banking industry by any means.
Matt Levin at Dealbreaker (former GS guy) describes Investment Bankers as "Travelling money salesmen". Do you feel that this description is apt? The operative word in your question is 'former'
Do you think that's how he described investment bankers whilst he was still with the firm?
People tend to get very bitter and sensitive after they get fired. See Gregg Smith for further evidence..
Is an MBA necessary to be competitive when looking for a job or is a B. Comm enough to compete with others when looking for jobs in the industry? Depends on what entry point - if you do an mba then you apply for associate entry whereas b.comm is an undergrad degree and so you apply for analyst roles. If you do a b.comm at a top university/college and get some internships then you should be well placed. Good luck!
Do any of your co-workers frequent Reddit? I imagine less than 0.1%.
Then again 2 people on this feed at least have claimed to be my co-workers, so who knows...
Since you're new to Reddit, what made you want to do an ama here? I'd like to alter the public perception of bankers - not all of us are the obnoxious greedy individuals you read about in the media.
I'm also extremely interested in hearing what non-finance people see as our key economic issues at the moment - this seemed a good way to find out.
Proof? How do i upload photos? i will upload photo proof. Sorry not very experienced with reddit!
I am a senior in high school and I am interested in majoring in either accounting or finance, but I don't think I know enough about either career path to make the best decision, can you explain the large differences the two paths I would go down depending on major, or any advice that may influence my decision that I would not know at this point? What you choose to study doesn't necessarily determine the industry you'll end up in. We have guys in the office who studied history, languages, even medicine. Just go for what interests you the most and focus on getting high marks.
Curious as to what kind of degree you hold/what was your GPA in college? BSc. Economics degree from LSE. First class honours, don't know about gpa
I used to work for the swiss banks and swiss stock market indirectly, and have a few friends in the banking business, including GS and Nakamura in London. What is your personall opinion on prostitution, cocaine, and medication misusage in your business? Also, also what is your stance on GS' questionable involvment in Backpage.com? With regards to backpage.com, the guys on the deal did not do their KYC checks properly. KYC checks are crucial for banks- your reputation and future success is more important than any single customer. Look up riggs bank and the Obiang family and then you'll see!
Possible. But realistically those kind of excuses are given no matter what really happened. For a company as big and powerful as GS I can only take it with a grain of salt. Are you content in the way GS does business from a moral point of view? It's either a pinch of salt, or a grain of sand...
Thanks. I'm not a native english speaker and have not used it regularly for years, so it's gotten pretty shit. Any chance you answer the other questions? Yes, apologies. I think some of our deals have been morally reprehensible in the past. The same goes for any major investment bank. But i think we've done a very good job in 'cleaning up our act' over the past few years and the public has played a large part in that. With any luck we will see a much healthier banking industry soon.
How accurate is what is said on the Twitter handle @GSElevator? It's grossly exaggerated, but not entirely inaccurate...
You guys got trolled hard. A GS IBD guy not knowing how to upload something to the internet? Seriously wtf. Probably some guy from wso who wanted to feel like he was "in". Link to i.imgur.com Just doing some work now! Link to i.imgur.com In case you wondered what Lloyd's signature looked like.
Is there anyway you can help me out, connections or anything, someone I should talk to to get a interview? Can you interview me, I shall forward you my resume! Private message me and we will discuss. Sure i can help you out. I know how tough it is for you guys who are trying to get in!
Any thoughts on the MSI/SSG mini-scandal this week? Yes but won't comment.
Very hush hush.
I also work for GS. Which building are you in? I'm based in PBC. Also IBD, North. Would do an AMA and provide proof. I'm in PBC too, moved from RC quite a few years ago. I'm not sure exactly what sort of proof i'm supposed to provide...?
Would you say you were groomed for this kind of work from a young age? LSE is an elite school. Did you go to elite private schools growing up or were you an exceptional student at a normal school? Yes, Jimmy groomed me from four years old
Do you like your job, or should i say career? Yes. If i did not then i would go and sail around the world again.
From your experience, how relevant is CFA nowdays? Definitely worth doing.
How large was your Xmas bonus and did it get taxed over 50%? See below - total comp was c.600k and yes taxed above 50%
You said in other replies that you were 22 when you got this job and make 600K now. How old are you now, and how long did it take you to get the that salary level? Is it all commission? Was analyst at 22 and then moved up the ranks. Just turned 30, feeling old now!.
Can you give some insight on the business model of Investment banking? (I have no clue to be honest) . And what does a portfolio manager do exactly? Portfolio manager is not IBD. He/she would work in investment management e.g. for blackrock or GSAM or a hedge fund.
I'm currently writing a thesis on the future of rentierism in the gulf with an emphasis on Saudi Arabia. I don't have much of an economic background apart from this, but the international energy market is obviously important to my research. Can you recommend any good (preferably free or low cost) primers and newsletters on the subject? Hmm there are many on energy market but not too sure about rentier specific ones. Will have a think. I did my university thesis on Saudi and so will have a dig around.
How do you live with yourself? Knowing that the company that you work for doesn't give a fuck about you or anybody. All they care about is money. They have ruined america many times over. Seriously, how do you live with yourself? Actually our business is dependent on America and more importantly the rest of the world's prosperity. So actually our interests are nicely aligned.
Link to www.rollingstone.com. Seems to me like your bosses and former bosses don't give a flying fuck about anyone but themselves. Can you name one good thing Sachs has done since you have been there? I think you meant 'don't give a flying fuck" in your comment.
Do you happen to work with quantitative analysts? Depends which deal we are working on. Sometimes we need them, other times we don't.
What's your retirement savings invested in? Property (international and uk), shares mainly through tax efficient ways e.g. isa and EIS, pensions and artwork.
No swiss bank account i am afraid.
"The first thing you'll realize is that they are extremely disciplined. You would never come across a Goldman employee, who would, after two or three beers, say "My colleagues are a bunch of dickheads" From Money and Power William D Cohan. What do you have to say about this? I agree with it.
What advice would you give someone who is interested in going into finance and is currently in university. What would you have liked to do in your time spent at LSE now looking back? Party more! You only live once. You can have that advice for free.
Thanks for the AMA. Do you know anybody I could speak with regarding interviewing and internship opportunities? Private message me.
Doing an AMAA are you putting your job at risk for releasing company secrets/opinions whatever? I've not released a single company secret.
Edit: added an A to AMA. There's nothing in my contract to say I can't express my own opinions.
What do the hopes and dreams of Americans taste like? Raspberry sorbet, in my opinion
What is your feeling on the separation of traditional banking and investment banking as is proposed by the FSA? I think overall it's sensible - Barclays being the best example of why they should be separated.
At GS specifically of course we're not involved in traditional retail banking at all so it's not the most pressing issue for us at the moment.
You mentioned 80 hour work weeks. Could you explain the timeline for your typical work day. Do you work 7 days per week? Is your work more project based where you go non stop and have some time off between projects? There's no typical working day - some days are 18 hours and others are 12. Depends entirely what stage of a deal we are at. Generally I work 5/6 days a week, but keep in email contact with the office 24/7.
Yes, entirely project based. But if we are doing our jobs properly there's not much 'time off' in between.
I'm currently on target for a 2:1 or a first at university in my economics degree. But due to a slight hiccup in my a-levels, in which i got A* A C, still managed to go to a top 10 university but do they look at the C, which was in maths. Your university grades are definitely more important. If you do well in a mathematical module at uni that will allay any fears they have about an A-level grade.
Do they look at a-level grades and expect a minimum maths grade? I'm not bad at maths by any means, just an unfortunate anomaly in the exam season. Which uni are you at and what do you study?
Manchester and economics BA - but i have econometric modules and another mathematical module for 2nd year. Any chance of switching it to a BSc? Immediately reassures employers about your quantitative skills..
Hello there, first of all I want to thank you for doing this AMA. I am a dutch college student and currently I'm writing an essay about the BRIC countries. I used your book to write down predictions of their economic future, and I'd like to ask: did you participate in writing that book? Are you referring to Jim O'Neill's book? I have a copy on my desk, but no I wasn't involved in writing it.
What do the guys at GS think about @gselevator? See same q&a earlier on!
How often do interns get recommended to come back? In a good year, approx. 50% of an intern class will get hired.
In a bad year (2008 for example) perhaps only 10% or 20%
Any opinion on Nautilus Minerals? Can't comment on that company i am afraid.
How do you feel about manipulating the currency markets to screw over the average retail trader? I don't know what you are talking about.
Have you ever seen American Psycho? Yes.
I am going to copy and paste this in an email and send it around my team. You will famous at the firm, well at least in my team in london anyway! Yes of course i fucking do. The future is inevitable. Chuck Klosterman i like your name. That would also be an awesome interview question! And i give them 5 secs to answer.
I highly doubt GS interns work for free. I've almost never heard of an internship in finance that didn't pay -- most firms I've encountered usually pay the same base wage as the first year full timer positions you are interning for. Interns in front office at GS in london get circa £42k pro rata. So not bad for a summer job and remember no tax as they are below threshold across the year!
Gold Mansachs. Not sure about that one.
I prefer Goldman Snachs, the name of our canteen.
Yes, Jimmy groomed me from four years old But yes went to a private boarding school before. Widening the diversity of applicants in IB is a key target for HCM.
What is the future of investment banking in a new world order where both governments and the people are fed up with the excesses that led us into this credit crisis. The industry is always evolving, that's what makes it an exciting industry to be in. I imagine it will take us a good few years to fully regain the trust of certain clients, but ultimately if this whole saga causes us to readdress our methods and practices to improve our service then in the long run it's a positive outcome.
PS. Do you not think people should be fed up with the governments too, as well as the banks?
Not OP but I can answer this as a 2012 intern who got converted for Programming. A Math degree is a good +. There are 2 ways. Either join in as a programmer, show your merit and change departments, ie move to Quant side. Other option is to get a MBA, and join the I-Banking dept you want. What's your name?
Do you have any books or resources you'd recommend the layman for learning investment skills (i.e. the wealthy barber) I ask because i feel there is a lot of crap out there and would like to genuinely learn. I have never heard of the wealthy barber.
Last updated: 2013-01-16 15:54 UTC
This post was generated by a robot! Send all complaints to epsy.
submitted by tabledresser to tabled [link] [comments]

Instant Trading Profits review - Does Instant Trading Profits Really Work?

Instant Trading Profits is a newly release binary options trading software. I already got my copy. Today I am going to write an honest Instant Trading Profits review to help those people out who want to trade with binary options. So read my Instant Trading Profits review.
Instant Trading Profits review - What is Instant Trading Profits?
Instant Trading Profits is a sort of Binary option trading software that you can download specifically to your desktop. It deals with the rule where you need to choose whether the cost of an advantage will go up or down in the following sixty seconds. All that you have to think about the trade and all the pointers are held in this one software thus you don't need to go around searching for them on a few sites.
What you have to do here is that you have to choose if the estimation of the advantage will go up or down when you hit the tab. This is finished with the utilization of two tabs: "Call" or "PUT".
When this is carried out, you sit tight for 60 seconds for the result! This is all that you have to do and it will guarantee that you begin profiting.
Instant Trading Profits Review - Does it really earn money?
We're distrustful reviewers along these lines commonly, we felt a bit concerned by the fantastic cases made by the producers of Instant Trading Profits ,thus we were dead set to put it under a test.
What's more sincerely, what would we be able to say? We were basically ASTONISHED at the astounding results we got from testing this item. In case you're considering contributing, then you ought to without a doubt attempt your fortunes with Instant Trading Profits to help you begin.
We acknowledge what you are considering. Is this item only one more con like such a variety of other financing items has ended up being previously? Obviously, you have numerous motivations to be suspicious, however the extent that Instant Trading Profits is concerned you don't simply take our pledge for it. Instant Trading Profits has gotten top stamps in various reviews from authoratitive sites – it truly does satisfy its claims. With an endorsement rate of just about 98%, this simply can't be a scam.
How Does Instant Trading Profits Work?
If you don't mind NOTE this critical thing that in the event that you visit the dealer site straightforwardly and store the cash there then you will most likely not be permitted to get to the software in any circumstances. The most ideal approach to get access to it is:
Step 1 : Visit the authority site here.
Step 2: Fill your email ID in the box given on the page.
Step 3: After that, you will be taken to Instant Trading Profits parts zone where you will discover a few directions to store cash in your Broker account. Just click that flag.
Step 4: Once you have stored the cash, you will be permitted to get to the Instant Trading Profits Software?
Pros:
Cons:
Bottom Line:
Instant Trading Profits is doubtlessly an unquestionable requirement have item on the off chance that you need to profit from trading Binary Options. You ought to be mindful that forex trading is a massively beneficial Liam White set and it is getting greater and greater. By utilizing at once Trading Profits framework and software, it spares your time to rapidly benefit from trading. This is truly profit. In the event that you strive to create any salary on the web, you ought to try this out.
Instant Trading Profits review, Instant Trading Profits Scam, Instant Trading Profits Proof, Instant Trading Profits results,
submitted by notinpura to instanttradingprofits [link] [comments]

Top 5 richest forex trading Millionaires in South Africa ... Wall Street Traders - Life of the Top Billionaire FX Traders Interview A Top Forex Trader - Way To Become A Multi ... FOREX Trader Jobs The Best Forex Trading Robot You Will Find 90% Win Rate ... Forex Trading Student Makes Monthly Salary in One Day- $5,000 Profit Steve Patterson: Top Prop Trader Shares His Secrets To ...

For traders who succeed in occupying the top 10% ranking, the salary range can reach $ 104,000 per year. These numbers do not include bonuses, so you can imagine for yourself how big the salary of institutional forex traders in the United States is. Experienced traders can even earn a base salary of between $ 100,000 to $ 120,000, with bonuses reaching $ 150,000 to $ 250,000 per year. Burdened ... What is the average forex trader salary? According to Payscale.com, the average forex trader salary is £43,977 in the UK - this is based on an average of 29 anonymous trader salaries.However this average differs between sites - according to indeed.co.uk, the average salary in the UK is £36,182, so it’s likely the average falls somewhere in the middle. Day Trader Salary - Learn How Much Top Traders Earn Forex Trading Articles 14 Min Read. Last Updated October 18th 2020. Day Trader Salary . You’ve heard the stories; you’ve heard of the growing popularity of forex; you’ve done your research and are now ready to become a forex trader. What appealed to you in the first place are probably the many advantages of forex trading, including ... The national average salary for a FX Trader is $92,872 in United States. Filter by location to see FX Trader salaries in your area. Salary estimates are based on 5 salaries submitted anonymously to Glassdoor by FX Trader employees. Traders employed by a firm can draw handsome salaries. In the United States, the average forex trader salary has been estimated to be around $68,487 per year with the highest salary set at $171,144 per year and the lowest fx trader salaries at $51,972 per year. Top 10 Highest Paying Cities for Forex Trader Jobs. We’ve identified 10 cities where the typical salary for a Forex Trader job is above the national average. Topping the list is San Jose, CA, with Oakland, CA and Tanaina, AK close behind in the second and third positions. Tanaina, AK beats the national average by $15,919 (17.7%), and San Jose ... According to Glassdoor.com, the average salary of the top 3 earners in the trading industry is around $570,000, while the national US average is somewhat lower at $89,000. The top trading location is New York, where a trader earns around 30% more than the national average of trading salaries. However, the concentration of banks, trading firms, and hedge funds make New York a very competitive ... Most new Forex traders have unrealistic profit expectations. They think it will be possible to make 25% – 50% or more month to month. They have dreams of turning their small account into a very large account in just a few years. This is totally unrealistic. If it were possible we would all be doing it. Most successful traders make a much lower average monthly profit (3%-7% is common). If you ... The average Foreign Exchange Trader III salary in the United States is $181,411 as of October 28, 2020, but the range typically falls between $141,664 and $212,208. Salary ranges can vary widely depending on many important factors, including education, certifications, additional skills, the number of years you have spent in your profession ... The average salary for a Foreign Exchange Trader is $76,233 per year in United States. Learn about salaries, benefits, salary satisfaction and where you could earn the most.

[index] [13313] [11655] [26971] [29449] [14173] [15895] [4863] [21564] [22294] [22431]

Top 5 richest forex trading Millionaires in South Africa ...

🤟 Discord 🤟: https://discord.gg/W9SkpvV Recommended Forex Broker ICMarkets: http://www.icmarkets.com/?camp=38580 myfxbook Live Results https://www.myfxbook.c... Managing $400,000: Prop Trader Shares His Secrets To Getting A Trading Job Watch previous interview w/ Steve: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HezJ_Whx6dE Spe... We are thrilled to have Folake join The Profit Room! She started with us back in Nov. 2019 Taking the Futures as well as the Forex Mentorship https://www.the... http://www.tradingsignalsfx.com There are plenty of opportunities to work as a FOREX trader. You can work as a trader in a bank for a fixed salary, you can c... -----­­----- CLICK HERE: http://www.beststrategytradingz.com/manh2-binary-option-trading -----... Please watch: "Top Forex traders in South Africa 2019 Scam Alert" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h7cqpxBdECI --~-- #forexbrokerkiller #forex #pip Welcome ... This documentary looks at the lifestyle of Wall street traders and focuses on the elite who trade a variety of instruments from stocks to bonds to Forex btu what they all have in common is their ...

https://binary-optiontrade.tessisupga.ml